Category Archive: Disaster

New reduce your risk tools

New York City’s dense population and geographic location make it especially vulnerable to emergencies caused by natural and man-made hazards. While it is important for you to protect yourself and your families from emergencies, it is also important to protect your property. The hazards faced by Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester residents are similar, with some exceptions (e.g., Westchester planners are concerned with an Indian Point event).

The New York City Emergency Management Department, in partnership with the New York City Department of City Planning and the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency, is pleased to announce the launch of NYC’s Risk Landscape: A Guide to Hazard Mitigation. Based on the FEMA-approved and locally adopted 2014 Hazard Mitigation Plan, NYC’s Risk Landscape focuses on a targeted group of hazards that pose a risk to the city, and includes information on how the City approaches risk management in a user-friendly and accessible format.  Additionally, the guide includes informative maps, infographics, and images to help New Yorkers gain a deeper understanding of specific hazards as well as best practices in risk reduction.  Hazards addressed in this guide include coastal erosion, coastal storms, earthquakes, extreme heat, flooding, pandemic influenza, strong windstorms, water shortage, and winter weather.

For more information, please visit nyc.gov/hazardmitigation or click here for the guide. Click for specific guidance for Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester Counties and for New York State.

For more information about how to Reduce Your Risk, please visitnyc.gov/reduceyourrisk or click here for the Ready New York: Reduce Your Risk brochure.

 

Webinar: Emergency Preparedness Resources for Houses of Worship

Posted on August 06, 2014

The Department of Homeland Security Center for Faith-based & Neighborhood Partnerships
the Small Business Administration Center for Faith-based & Community Initiatives
(Both Centers of the White House Office of Faith-based & Neighborhood Partnerships)
and the Federal Emergency Management Agency

invite you to join us for:

A Webinar on Emergency Preparedness Tools & Resources for Houses of Worship and Community Organizations

WEBINAR

________________

 

Learn more about tools, resources and partnerships strategies to help faith-based and community organizations prepare for emergencies!

WEBINAR DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this webinar is to provide participants with information on emergency preparedness tools, resources and engagement strategies that are available to faith-based and community leaders and emergency managers. Presentations will explain how faith-based and community-based organizations can engage in National Preparedness Month 2014 and National PrepareAthon Day! activities. The presentations will also highlight engagement best practices at the state and local level between faith-based and community leaders and emergency managers to prepare faith and community-based organizations and the larger community.WHO SHOULD JOIN THE WEBINAR? This webinar is for anyone interested in learning more about resources to help faith-based and community-based organizations get prepared for emergencies and help their communities to do the same.

WHEN IS THE WEBINAR? 

August 19, 2014
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

HOW DO I JOIN THE WEBINAR?

Adobe Connect Web Link: https://icpd.adobeconnect.com/faithtoolsa/event/registration.html

Please sign in as a guest.  Be sure to test your Adobe Connect connection prior to the meeting by clicking here.

PRESENTERS. Representatives from the Georgia Emergency Management Agency, County of Los Angeles Office of Emergency Management and Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department’s Office of Emergency Management will present.  The Small Business Administration Center for Faith-based & Community Initiatives and Department of Homeland Security Center for Faith-based & Neighborhood Partnerships, will also provide remarks in support of houses of worship and community organizations engaging in preparedness activities.

Resources to prepare your organization’s technology for a disaster

Posted on July 23, 2014

Tech Soup is a respected and valuable technology resource for nonprofits (If you don’t know about their deeply-discounted software, you should). They recently published an excellent disaster planning guide:  The Resilient Organization. Find their links to the new guide and related webinars below.


Disaster preparedness isn’t just about being ready for a fire or earthquake; it’s a nimble, flexible approach to your organization’s day-to-day programs and operations. A natural disaster may never hit your office, but by adopting certain technologies and strategies, you can deepen your nonprofit’s impact and make your work faster and more efficient. The resources in this toolkit will not only prepare you for a crisis, but also deepen the impact of your nonprofit or charity in times of health.

The Resilient Organization is a holistic guide to disaster planning and recovery. This book is intended both for organizations striving to be better prepared for an emergency and for organizations striving to rebuild and maintain operations after a disaster. Download The Resilient Organization and browse other disaster planning and recovery resources below. The book comes in four formats:

Entertaining Disaster Preparedness 101 videos

MetroKC“A Tale of Disaster and Preparedness,” the fun and informative video series created by the Metropolitan Emergency Managers Committee of Greater Kansas City, won first place in the Public Awareness Award of the IAEM. The episodes are 2-3 minutes each, with a lot of good information. View the entire video series on  YouTube.

Posted in Disaster

Disaster mental health guidance

Our friend Ali Gheith, MS, CEM, (Coordinator of Population Based Resilience at the Office of Mental Health Disaster Preparedness & Response, NYC Dept. Of Health And Mental Hygiene) sent us these helpful tip sheets:

Please help communicate the information provided in these sheets to the people you are serving. One additional tip:

Don’t forget to take care of yourselves. These are stressful times and we have lots of people depending on us. We won’t be any good to them if we aren’t functioning at a high level.

For additional information contact Ali at agheith@health.nyc.gov.