Category Archive: Common

State security grant webinar: Tuesday, January 14th from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

Announcing New York State Security Grant opportunities for eligible nonpublic schools, nonprofit day care centers, nonprofit community centers, nonprofit cultural museums, and nonprofit residential and day camps.

Want to learn more about the application process?

Jewish Community Relations Council of New York (JCRC-NY) and UJA-Federation of New York and invite you to an online training:

Tuesday, January 14th from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

What will the training cover?

Prequalification, navigating the application process, security bridge loans, and more. Organizations that participate may be eligible to access additional assistance in the grant application process. To register and receive instructions for participation, please click here.

Please find further information on the Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes grant below.


 Governor Andrew M. Cuomo is committed to ensuring the safety and equal treatment of all New Yorkers and as such has continued support of the Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Program.  This program is designed to boost safety and security at New York’s nonprofit organizations at risk of hate crimes or attacks because of their ideology, beliefs, or mission. In support of this effort, $45 million in grant funding is being made available on a statewide basis and will be administered by the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (DHSES).

The NYS Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services is releasing the Request for Applications (RFAs) to solicit proposals to support projects under the SFY2019-2020 Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Program (SCAHC Program) and the SFY2019-2020 Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Program with Local Matching Funds (SCAHC Match Program).

  • SFY2019-2020 Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Program (SCAHC) – $25 million has been made available through this competitive grant program to eligible nonpublic nonprofit schools, nonprofit day care centers, nonprofit community centers, nonprofit cultural museums and nonprofit residential camps which demonstrate a risk of a hate crime due to their ideology, beliefs or mission.  Applications will be accepted for up to $50,000 per facility.  Eligible organizations may submit up to five applications for a maximum total request of $250,000.
  • SFY2019-2020 Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes with Local Matching Funds (SCAHC Match Program).  $20 million in grant funding has been made available through this competitive grant program to eligible nonpublic nonprofit schools, and nonprofit day camps which demonstrate a risk of a hate crime due to their ideology, beliefs or mission.  Applications will be accepted for up to $50,000 per facility (with a local cost match per application). Eligible organizations may submit up to five applications for a maximum total request of $250,000 (including local cost match).

Nonprofit organizations that are applying for these funding opportunities must be prequalified in the NYS Grants Gateway prior to application submission.

To learn more about prequalification, go to the Grants Management website.

The Request for Applications (RFA) and other required documents for both of these grant programs can be found here.

The due date for applications for both programs is February 27, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

Any applications and/or supporting documentation received after the due date and time will not be considered.

Create Your Crisis Communication Plan

CDC

2019 Resolution: Create Your Crisis Communication Plan | 12/19@1PM

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent this bulletin at 12/18/2018 01:20 PM EST

Don’t keep this great resource to yourself! Please share it with your colleagues and networks. If you would like more information on emergency preparedness and response, visit CDC’s Emergency Preparedness & Response website. Need a New Year’s resolution? Create a crisis communication plan for your organization. This is the best way to make sure you can effectively communicate potentially life-saving messages to the people you serve. Join CDC’s Kellee Waters on December 19 at 1 PM ET to learn more.

Closed captioning is available:https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=3845314&CustomerID=321.

More information on this webinar, previous EPIC webinars, and information on CE units can be found on the EPIC Webinar website. 

Presenter: Kellee Waters, ABJ
Emergency Risk Communication Branch
Center for Preparedness and Response 

Webinar ObjectivesWebinar participants and viewers will accomplish the following:Describe CDC’s role in the topic covered during the presentation.Describe the topic’s implications for respective constituentsDiscuss concerns and issues related to preparedness for and response to urgent public health threats.Identify reliable information resources for the topic.Describe how to promote health improvement, wellness, and disease prevention. 

Connection Information: When: Dec 19, 2018 1:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: 2019 Resolution: Create Your Crisis Communication Plan

Please click the link below to join the webinar: 
https://zoom.us/j/336888256

iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16468769923,,336888256#  or +16699006833,,336888256# 

Or Telephone:
    Dial (for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 876 9923  or +1 669 900 6833 
    Webinar ID: 336 888 256
   
International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/adj4rkruovCONTACT 
Posted in Common

Are you prepared? 5 steps to make your facility safer and more secure

Posted on August 30, 2017

(Click here to download a PDF of this webpage)

Organizational leaders should work to strike a balance: to offer a warm and welcoming facility, while at the same time ensuring that their members, students, staffs, clients and building are safe and secure. Leaders concerned with everybody’s safety and security should prepare to deal with emergencies, because “on the fly” reflexes might not be as effective as a pre-determined and rehearsed plan. While your “to-do” list at the beginning of the academic and program year is long, consider these tips to help you prepare for emergencies and ensure you can protect your constituencies.

1.  Control access to your facility

No unauthorized person should be allowed to enter your facility. Every person entering your facility should be screened by security (or other) staff.

  • Limit entrances and exits. Limit access to your facility to monitored entrances.
  • Don’t slow down regular users. Create a system to identify regulars (e.g., staff, members).
  • Screen irregular visitors. g., people with appointments, contractors, etc. See more at Sample Building Access Policies & Procedures.
  • Divide your building into sectors. Should people authorized to use one part of the building be able to wander into another? If you have an access control system, take advantage of its capabilities to allow specific access. Alternatively, use color-coded badges, wristbands or ID cards as a low-tech solution.

2. Plan your emergency response

Stuff happens. Emergencies are not events that you can handle on the fly. Consider having plans, procedures and designated teams empowered to make decisions during emergencies, and trained and prepared to respond to events.

  • Develop and train an emergency response team. Designate someone to be in charge during an emergency and someone else as backup. Build a support team. Have the team work together on your response plans.
  • Build a relationship with your local police.Work with your local police throughout the year and give them the opportunity to get to know your programs, your rhythms, your people and your building. Ask them for suggestions as to how to make your people safer.
  • Know what to do if you receive a threat. Get some ideas about preparing for phone, email or social media threats and evacuations and sheltering at: http://www.jcrcny.org/2017/02/to-evacuate-or-not-to-evacuate-that-is-the-question/.
  • Have an “active shooter” Do the people in your facility know what to do if a person with a gun or sharp-edged weapon shows up? Find more information at: www.jcrcny.org/activeshooter.
  • Be ready to tell people what’s happening. Don’t let your stakeholders learn about an emergency at your facility from the media. Be prepared to communicate. Have some pre-written messages: be first; be right; be credible. Consider options including hardware and web-based emergency notification systems that will simultaneously email, text and phone pre-prepared lists, dedicated social media groups or free apps such as WhatsApp or GroupMe that will send texts (including a link to your website with more info and updates). Now is the time to collect the cell numbers of your stakeholders.
  • Involve your board in the security and preparedness process.

3. Develop a routine

Security, done well, must be done daily and involve everybody.

  • Create a culture of security. Everyone should feel responsible to report suspicious activity. “If you see something, say something” should be part of your culture of security.
  • Be aware of hostile surveillance. If you see something, say something. If it is not an emergency, call the NYPD at (888) NYC-SAFE, outside NYC (866) SAFE-NYS. For more information download Indicators of Terrorist Activity from the NYPD, Guide to Detecting Surveillance of Jewish Institutions from the ADL at adl.org/security and Security Awarenessby Paul DeMatties at Global Security Risk Management,  LLC.
  • Schedule regular walkarounds. Designate an employee to complete a “walkaround” of your building and your perimeter on a daily basis, if not more often. They should be looking for suspicious objects, items blocking evacuation routes and anything else that “Just Doesn’t Look Right.”
  • Make sure you’re getting the right information. Sign up for alerts to learn when the local and/or global security threats conditions change. Sources: JCRC-NY Security Alerts at jcrcny.org/security, https://www.nypdshield.org/public/signup.aspx, emergency alerts from Notify NYC or your local emergency management office and have a weather app on your smartphone to warn you about severe weather.
  • Work with your security provider and your staff to write, “post orders”. Your guards should not merely decorate your entrance. They should know what you expect them to do daily and in emergencies.

4. Don’t forget to train

Major leaguers take batting practice before every game. True, they started batting in the Little Leagues, but drills help people to know, instinctively, what to do. Emergencies that turn to chaos become crises. People know what to do during a fire drill, because they have participated in fire drills since grade school.

Use tabletop exercises involving a wide swath of stakeholders to help you to determine policies and procedures. Once you have determined your plans and procedures, schedule evacuation and lockdown drills. And remember … once is not enough.

5. Explore your security hardware options

Your security hardware should support your security procedures. There are federal and New York State grants available for many organizations (see: www.jcrcny.org/securitygrants for more details). Consider obtaining the funding for:

  • Your main and secondary doors should lock securely and be able to withstand an attack by a determined intruder.
  • Do your windows lock securely? Reduce the risk of break-ins, vandalism and even mitigate the extent of injuries from bomb blasts by properly installing security/blast-mitigation film on your current windows or replacing them with windows with those properties built-in.
  • Access control systems. The electronic possibilities are endless: access cards, biometrics, alarms and more. Get professional advice (see JCRC-NY’s guidance on Security vendors), figure out a hardware plan that is expandable and adaptable.
  • Video monitoring. Deploy CCTV systems in various ways. First, as part of a video intercom system to identify people seeking to enter your facility. Second, to monitor secondary entrances (you can add alarms that warn you that a door was opened, alerting someone to check the monitor), and finally, to help to detect hostile surveillance.
 David Pollock and Paul DeMatteis
security@jcrcny.org | August 30, 2017

Nonprofit Security Grant Program 2016 | It’s here

We’ve taken an initial look at the federal guidance and not much is new. Stay tuned for specifics.

NYS Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (NY DHSES) will develop its RFA (application package) based on the DHS guidance and specify a deadline for all applications to be electronically submitted (State agencies must have time to judge and process several hundred submissions, so the applicant deadline will be considerably sooner than the federal deadline). The RFA will be posted at: http://www.dhses.ny.gov/grants/nonprofit.cfm. Note: In NY, the requirements and deadlines posted by NY DHSES are final.

We’ve scheduled a webinar with our NY DHSES partners for Monday, February 22, 2016 at 11 AM. Click here to make a reservation and to receive the sign-in instructions to join the webinar. 

NSGP 2016: Here’s what you can do now
Prequalification NY nonprofits should register at https://grantsgateway.ny.gov/ &
complete their Document Vault . See JCRC-NY’s additional
information at: http://www.jcrcny.org/document-vault-faqs/If your nonprofit was previously prequalified, you will still have to update certain documents or your document vault is expired. Check our your document vault for more information.
E-Grant registration If you have an existing account (and remember the
username/password), you’re fine; to register for the DHSES E-Grant
system, email: grants@dhses.ny.gov
Risk assessment Find guidance and contacts at:
http://www.jcrcny.org/security-assessment/
Investment Justification Download
http://www.jcrcny.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/FY2015NSGP_InvestmentJustification.pdf and work on responses to each section. It’s unlikely that there will be any significant changes, except possibly Section VII (Impact).
For the most up-to-date info http://www.jcrcny.org/securitygrants

JCRC-NY and UJA-Federation worked closely with JFNA and its partners worked very hard to bolster the NSGP program allocation this year, and the roles of the Orthodox Union and Agudath Israel were critical.

– See more at: http://www.jcrcny.org/what-we-do/security-emergency-preparedness/blog/#sthash.U5mnLs3l.dpuf

JCRC: training here, training there

The past few months have been busy with JCRC-NY coordinating major  training sessions for hundreds of institutions in the NY area. There is a heightened awareness of the potential for attacks and a willingness on the part of organizations to “Step up their Game.”

All of the trainings focused on security/terrorism awareness, building a culture of security within organizations and active shooter responses. Kudos and thanks to our wonderful partners, including: NYPD Counterterrorism, U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. Our common goals are to strengthen the ties between law enforcement and nonprofit organizations and to empower them by giving them to tools and knowledge to respond as well as possible. Here’s some examples of our recent work: Continue Reading