Category Archive: Cybersecurity

Reminder: Safeguard Against Ransomware Attacks

Posted on July 31, 2019

In light of the increasing number of reports of ransomware attacks against government data DHS and its partners issued the following statement. The three steps to resilience are good advice for all of us to implement.


CISA, MS-ISAC, NGA & NASCIO RECOMMEND IMMEDIATE ACTION TO SAFEGUARD AGAINST RANSOMWARE ATTACKS

Take the First Three Steps to Resilience Against Ransomware for State and Local Partners

WASHINGTON – July 29, 2019 – The recent ransomware attacks targeting systems across the country are the latest in a string of attacks affecting State and local government partners. The growing number of such attacks highlights the critical importance of making cyber preparedness a priority and taking the necessary steps to secure our networks against adversaries. Prevention is the most effective defense against ransomware.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC), National Governors Association (NGA), and the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) are committed to supporting ransomware victims and encouraging all levels of government to proactively protect their networks against the threat of a ransomware attack. Today, we call on our State, local, territorial and tribal government partners, along with the wider cyber community, to take the following essential actions to enhance their defensive posture against ransomware. Through this collective action, we can better protect ourselves and our communities, and further advance the cyber preparedness and resilience of the Nation.

Three Steps to Resilience Against Ransomware

Back-Up Your Systems – Now (and Daily)

Immediately and regularly back up all critical agency and system configuration information on a separate device and store the back-ups offline, verifying their integrity and restoration process. If recovering after an attack, restore a stronger system than you lost, fully patched and updated to the latest version.

Reinforce Basic Cybersecurity Awareness and Education

Ransomware attacks often require the human element to succeed. Refresh employee training on recognizing cyber threats, phishing and suspicious links – the most common vectors for ransomware attacks. Remind employees of how to report incidents to appropriate IT staff in a timely manner, which should include out-of-band communication paths.

Revisit and Refine Cyber Incident Response Plans

Agencies must have a clear plan to address attacks when they occur, including when internal capabilities are overwhelmed. Make sure response plans include how to request assistance from external cyber first responders, such as state agencies, CISA and the MS-ISAC, in the event of an attack.

Additional Resources

After implementing these recommendations, refer to the ransomware best practices published by CISA, MS-ISAC, NGA, and NASCIO for additional steps to protect your organization.

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Posted in Cybersecurity

Cyber attacks increase, what can you do?

Posted on July 24, 2019

Cybersecurity Best Practices

The following is a list of best practices designed to keep individuals and their data safe when connected to the internet.

EMAIL SECURITY

  • Avoid opening emails, downloading attachments, or clicking on suspicious links sent from unknown or untrusted sources.

  • Verify unexpected attachments or links from known senders by contacting them via another method of communication.

  • Avoid providing your email address, phone number, or other personal information to unknown sources.

  • Avoid providing sensitive information to anyone via email. If you must, be sure to encrypt it before sending.

  • Be skeptical of emails written with a sense of urgency and requesting an immediate response, such as those stating your account will be closed if you do not click on an embedded link or provide the sender with sensitive information.

  • Beware of emails with poor design, grammar, or spelling.

  • Ensure an email’s “sender name” corresponds to the correct email address to identify common email spoofing tactics.

  • Never open spam emails; report them as spam, and/or delete them. Do not respond to spam emails or use included “Unsubscribe” links as this only confirms to the spammer that your email address is active and may exacerbate the problem.

PASSWORDS AND MULTI-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION

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Use strong passwords on all of your accounts.  

  • Long, complex passwords make you less susceptible to brute-force attacks.

  • Use a combination of upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters.

  • Avoid easy-to-guess elements like pets’ names, children’s names, birthdays, etc.

To reduce the risk of account compromise, account holders should:

  • Avoid using the same password across multiple accounts or platforms.

  • Never share their password with anyone, leave passwords out in the open for others to read, or store them in an unsecured, plaintext file on computers or mobile devices.

  • Consider using long acronyms or passphrases to increase the length of your password.

  • Enable two-factor authentication (2FA) or multi-factor authentication (MFA) on all accounts that offer it. This will help prevent unauthorized access in the event of credential compromise.

ON THE WEB

  • Ensure any websites requesting the insertion of account credentials and those used to conduct transactions online are encrypted with a valid digital certificate to ensure your data is secure. These website addresses will have a green padlock displayed in the URL field and will begin with https.

  • Avoid saving account information, such as passwords or credit card information, in web browsers or browser extensions.

  • Avoid using public computers and public Wi-Fi connections to log into accounts and access sensitive information.

  • Consider using ad-blocking, script-blocking, and coin-blocking browser extensions to protect systems against malicious advertising attacks and scripts designed to launch malware or mine cryptocurrency.

  • Sign out of accounts and shut down computers and mobile devices when not in use. Program systems and devices to automatically lock the active session after a set period of inactivity.

DEVICE SECURITY

  • Keep all hardware and software updated with the latest, patched version.

  • Run reputable antivirus or anti-malware applications on all devices and keep them updated with the latest version.

  • Create multiple, redundant backups of all critical and sensitive data and keep them stored off the network in the event of a ransomware infection or other destructive malware incident. This will allow you to recover lost files, if needed.

New DHS resource guide and mail screening poster

Posted on June 04, 2019

New resource guide. Take a look at DHS’ new resource guide, Security of Soft Targets and Crowded Places. It’s essentially a one-stop table of contents for DHS’s free materials, including links for help on identifying suspicious activity, access control and screening, active assailants (they’re not just shooters anymore) and bomb threats. Follow the supplied links for an introduction to facility security that can serve as a good first step for houses of worship, schools and other soft targets. Resources include fact sheets, guidance, and online training and education courses.


Mail screening poster. Thanks to the world’s leading geopolitical intelligence platform, Stratfor, for its timely reminder about mail and package screening after an attempted bombing.

  • While many questions remain in the case of a parcel bomb sent to a Mexican senator, the largest is why the mail of such a high-level official was not screened.
  • While politicians and large corporations clearly must take significant measures to screen their mail, even ordinary people (and Jewish organizations) should open their mail cautiously.
  • Simple steps can help everyone from the largest entities to the average citizen.

Note that Cesar Sayoc, 57, admitted in court to having mailed 16 explosive devices to a variety of officials and to CNN’s offices in October 2018. He allegedly said he would “eradicate the Jews” if he had the power to, along with lesbians, black people and Hispanic people.

We urge you to download the tips found on the Stratfor graphic and share it with your staff and others.

May 5779 be a year of peace and security; what you can do to help

Posted on August 09, 2018

Rosh Chodesh Elul includes clarion calls indicating that the High Holidays are coming soon. So, now is a good time to check out a recent presentation on synagogue security or to take a deeper dive into the library of documents available on the JCRC-NY Security Resources pages. Here are some relevant selections:

High Holiday Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Library

Topical guidance

Vulnerability, Risk and Safety Assessments and Planning

Could you be the next victim? How the Russians hacked us.

Posted on July 16, 2018

Phishing has been in the news lately. The latest indictment from the Special Counsel’s Office (i.e., Mueller) shows that it’s easy to become a victim (see the screenshot below and click on it for more info).  The attack was both sophisticated and surprisingly simple.

Government sources report that phishing attacks are up. You don’t have to be the target of sophisticated government cyber-warriors. Too many bad actors know the tricks of the trade and they can hijack your identity, your data and/or plant ransomware on your computer.

We’ve collected tips from various sources to help you to identify potentially-dangerous phishing emails. Just click on How to spot phishing like a pro. The document has several examples and is in PDF format so that you can download it and distribute it widely.

Remember to practice the basics:

  1. Don’t click on links that you don’t recognize.
  2. Use strong passwords.
  3. Install anti-virus/anti-malware protection and keep the definitions up to date.
  4. Install security updates for the software on your computer as they are released.

For more information, tips and resources see our dedicated webpage: www.jcrcny.org/cybersecurity.