Category Archive: Uncategorized

New York Times: Insurance guidance

After #Sandy: Rockland and Westchester included

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that #Westchester and #Rockland counties have been added to the Major Disaster declaration. Both counties have been designated for Individual Assistance and Public Assistance Category A and B, as well as DFA Direct Federal Assistance. #NYGov. Cuomo  Residents should follow the steps in After #Sandy: Recovery 101 to access assistance.

 

Disaster mental health guidance

Our friend Ali Gheith, MS, CEM, (Coordinator of Population Based Resilience at the Office of Mental Health Disaster Preparedness & Response, NYC Dept. Of Health And Mental Hygiene) sent us these helpful tip sheets:

Please help communicate the information provided in these sheets to the people you are serving. One additional tip:

Don’t forget to take care of yourselves. These are stressful times and we have lots of people depending on us. We won’t be any good to them if we aren’t functioning at a high level.

For additional information contact Ali at agheith@health.nyc.gov.

Federal Aid Programs for State of New York Disaster Recovery

OCTOBER 30, 2012
Release Number:
HQ-12-123Factsheet

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for New York.

Assistance for Affected Individuals and Families Can Include as Required:

  • Rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes are unlivable.  Initial assistance may be provided for up to three months for homeowners and at least one month for renters.  Assistance may be extended if requested after the initial period based on a review of individual applicant requirements.  (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance to make damaged dwellings safe, sanitary and functional.  (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants to replace personal property and help meet medical, dental, funeral, transportation and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs.   (Source: FEMA funded at 75 percent of total eligible costs; 25 percent funded by the state.)
  • Unemployment payments up to 26 weeks for workers who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for state benefits, such as self-employed individuals.  (Source: FEMA funded; state administered.)
  • Low-interest loans to cover residential losses not fully compensated by insurance.  Loans available up to $200,000 for primary residence; $40,000 for personal property, including renter losses.  Loans available up to $2 million for business property losses not fully compensated by insurance.  (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $2 million for small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and most private, non-profit organizations of all sizes that have suffered disaster-related cash flow problems and need funds for working capital to recover from the disaster’s adverse economic impact.  This loan in combination with a property loss loan cannot exceed a total of $2 million. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $500,000 for farmers, ranchers and aquaculture operators to cover production and property losses, excluding primary residence. (Source: Farm Service Agency, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.)
  • Other relief programs: Crisis counseling for those traumatized by the disaster; income tax assistance for filing casualty losses; advisory assistance for legal, veterans benefits and social security matters.

Assistance for the State and Affected Tribal and Local Governments Can Include as Required: (JCRC comment: probably available to some nonprofits)

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for removing debris from public areas and for emergency measures, including direct federal assistance, taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state, tribal and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Those in the county designated for assistance to affected residents and business owners can begin the disaster application process by registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362. The toll-free telephone numbers are available from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) Monday through Sunday until further notice.  Applicants registering for aid should be prepared to provide basic information about themselves (name, permanent address, phone number), insurance coverage and any other information to help substantiate losses.
  • Application procedures for local and state governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved mitigation projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Follow FEMA online at www.fema.gov/blog, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate’s activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema. 

‘Frankenstorm’ poses a threat to NYC area and beyond

As you’ve probably heard in the media, Hurricane Sandy (now dubbed ‘Frankenstorm’, will move northward through the Bahamas on Friday, bringing tropical storm conditions to the east coast of Florida. Tropical storm conditions are possible in the Carolinas Saturday and Saturday night. Sandy is expected to turn toward the northeast on Saturday, followed by a turn to the northwest early next week, with direct impacts expected for the Mid-Atlantic or Northeast U.S. on Monday and/or Tuesday. The most  current forecast can always be found here.

Stay tuned! Sandy could miss our region entirely, brush by it, or slam directly into it early next week. Experts believe the area will not go unscathed.  A direct-hit scenario would have “huge implications” in our area.  Even if Sandy only makes a “close pass” it will likely be impactful; with strong winds that would topple trees causing widespread power outages, storm surge, and coastal flooding.

If you have not done so already, it is important that you:

  • Keep up to date with local conditions – follow TV and radio reports from your area and be prepared to follow guidance from Governor Cuomo, Mayor Bloomberg and other local officials.
  • Check your family’s emergency supply kit – make certain you have food, water, medications, and other necessities to sustain you, your family and family pets for at least 72 hours.
  • Remember food safety – power outages and flooding may happen as a result of a tropical storm or hurricane, so have a plan for keeping food safe. Have a cooler on hand to keep food cold, and group food together in the freezer so it stays cold longer.
  • Have an adequate communication plan – be sure friends and family know how to contact you. Teach family members how to use text messaging as text messages can often get around network disruptions when a phone call can’t get through.

Keep in mind, hurricanes bring heavy rains, storm surges, and possible flooding events. Avoid walking or driving through any flooded areas – it takes only six inches of fast-moving flood water to knock over an adult and two feet to move a vehicle. Remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

You can get hurricane safety tips from NYC Office of Emergency Management here or right on your phone by downloading these useful apps:

Posted in Sandy, Uncategorized