2022-2023 Consultant’s Corner

November 22, 2022

Welcome to our 2022-2023 season of Consultant’s Corner. We will put the latest recordings of our grant application webinars here. We hope you might find information that will help you with your grant process..

11-22-2022

I Got A Government Security Grant – Now What?

Click here to view  our entire 2022-2023 Consultant’s Corner playlist.

2021-2022 Consultant’s Corner

October 14, 2022

In anticipation of our next round of grant announcements we have included links to episodes of our 2021-2022 Consultant’s Corner webinars.  Take a look at our video recordings. You may find the topics covered relevant to your grant process.

11-16-2021

I Received A Security Grant, Now What?

11-23-2021

What Do We Need, and How Do We Get Bids?

11-30-2021

Appointing A Project Manager

12-7-2021

Environmental and Historic Preservation Form (EHP)

12-14-2021

Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Grant (SCAHC)

1-4-2022

Grant Management Part II

11-11-2022

RFP and Bid Management

1-18-2022

RFP Package Part 2 and Lessons from Colleyville

1-25-2022

RFP Package Continued: Basics of Product Research

2-1-2022

Door Hardware and Door Hardening

2-8-2022

Procurement Process

2-15-2022

Protecting Windows

2-22-2022

Access Control

3-1-2022

Access Control 2; Mindset Plus Technology

3-8-2022

Reducing Door, Frame & Hardware Vulnerabilities

3-15-2022

Special Presentation: Your Security and Grant Questions Answered Live

3-22-2022

Year-to-Date Topics Summary

3-29-2022

Developing a Training Program

Watch all our webinars in order:  2021-2022 Consultant’s Corner Playlist

Nonprofit security grant updates

April 07, 2022

Application information for the Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) will be released by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on or about May 13, 2022. NY DHSES will publish its Request for Applications shortly thereafter. Anticipate an New York application window of two weeks or less. Take steps immediately to address the issues below. 

What can you do immediately?

  1. Review the latest information. If you didn’t see FEMA’s technical assistance presentation last week, click here to see the slides, including allowable projects, recommendations and other basic information. Note: this year’s Investment Justification will be in the easier-to-use PDF format. Another change, new applicants will be eligible for a 15 point bonus.
  2. Get a UEI. Previous grantees all know about DUNS numbers, but DUNS numbers will not be accepted. Obtain a Unique Entity Identifier (UEI). This process is challenging so do not leave it until the last minute. Click here to download the Quick Start Guide for Getting a Unique Entity Identifier
  3. Update your Document Vault. All New York applicants must be prequalified in order to submit an application. 
    • Certain financial documents must be updated annually. If you are already prequalified, ensure that all financial documentation in your document vault is current and will not be expiring in the near future. Organizations with expired documentation will not be considered for funding. 
    • Organizations that used the “Streamlined” prequalification process for the Hate Crimes (SCAHC) grants last year must  prequalify using the traditional process. 

For more information on prequalification, and maintaining prequalification, please visit: https://grantsmanagement.ny.gov/get-prequalified.

    1. Assessments. An up-to-date vulnerability assessment must be attached to each application. CSI will continue to deliver assessments to organizations on a three-year cycle (once every three years). The vulnerability assessment submitted must be current and accurately reflect the site’s security vulnerabilities at the time your application is submitted
        • Click here to request a physical or cybersecurity assessment, training or purchasing support. Note, the CSI team is delivering scores of physical assessments and CSI has brought in additional experts. However, at this time we cannot guarantee the delivery of physical assessments before the grant applications are due. 
        • Organizations can update their recent assessments. Click here for instructions. CSI will supply our current threat overview. Request one here
        • The vulnerability assessment must contain the site’s physical address, which must match the physical address provided in the Investment Justification (IJ) and in the Work Plan of your E-Grants application. 
        • Each and every project being requested in the IJ must be clearly linked to a security vulnerability identified in the vulnerability assessment.  Requested projects that are not reflected as vulnerabilities in the assessment will not be funded.
      1. E-Grants. You must be a registered user of the DHSES E-Grants System.  All applications must be submitted to DHSES using this system.  If you need information about this system or need to register for access, please see the NY DHSES website for instructions: https://www.dhses.ny.gov/e-grants
      2. Charities Bureau.
        You must be registered, have recently applied for registration, or be exempt from registering with the NYS Attorney General’s Office Charities Bureau: https://www.charitiesnys.com/charities_new.html.

2020-21 NYS DHSES Virtual Workshops for grantees and applicants

February 04, 2021

Please see the offerings from NYS DHSES below. Note that most of the sessions are for current grantees.

  • There will be a session on the nonprofit programs on Thursday, February 11th@ 1PM. Click here to register. Here is more information.
  • The Community Security Initiative and NYS DHSES will present at Rep. Grace Meng’s Nonprofit Security Program Grant Workshop on Wednesday, February 10, 2020 from 6PM to 7:30PM. To RSVP and receive the Zoom link email: MENG.RSVP@MAIL.HOUSE.GOV.
  • Organizations planning to submit a NSGP application must include an assessment. Click here to apply for a professional assessment from the Community Security Initiative at no charge to your organization.

Here is more information from NYS DHSES:

The New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (DSHES) Grants Regional Workshops are an annual event which have historically been held at multiple locations statewide every fall. Being unable to hold these events in person for 2020, we have announced the 2020 DHSES Grants Virtual Workshops and the 2020 DHSES Grants Virtual Workshops – Nonprofit Series, which will be delivered via WebEx on multiple key dates between December 2020 and March 2021. The purpose of the Workshops is to provide critical updates on homeland security grant funding, provide technical assistance on meeting the various grant requirements and to obtain feedback as well as answer your questions on these key issues.

We have set up this page to be able to share important information and documents regarding the Virtual Workshops, including presentation recordings and slides, which will be posted following the delivery of each presentation. Please note that the Virtual Workshops are for informational purposes and may not address your questions directly, however you can always reach out to your Contract Representative for further clarification.

Grants Program Administration: Who We Are / What We Do – Delivered Friday, December 11, 2020
Target Audience: Government sector subrecipients, Nonprofit organizations

Tutorial on Minority and Women Owned Business Enterprises (MWBE) Requirements – Delivered Tuesday, January 12, 2021
Target Audience: Government sector subrecipients

Navigating E-Grants and Quarterly Reporting – Delivered Thursday, January 28, 2021
Target Audience: Government sector subrecipients, Nonprofit organizations

Any questions or comments about the content herein or the Virtual Workshops can be directed to the Grants Info box: Grant.Info@dhses.ny.gov

Federal and NY State security grants updates

February 23, 2020

Eligible nonprofits can now apply for both state and federal grants to upgrade their security. Some requirements apply to both sets of grants.

  1. All not-for-profit organizations must be prequalified in order to do business with New York State and to apply for grants. See the options below, under the appropriate grant.
  2. All New York State applicants must submit their grants through the E-Grants system. If you are already registered, use your existing username and password. If you need to register download the E-Grants Registration Form.
  3. Not-for-Profit (NFP) organizations receiving an award greater than $50,000 are required to complete a Vendor Responsibility Questionnaire.  This form is available at http://www.osc.state.ny.us/vendrep/forms_vendor.htm .  Vendors can also file the Vendor Responsibility Questionnaire online through the Office of the State Comptroller (OSC) New York State VendRep System.  To enroll and use the OSC NYS VendRep system, instructions are available at http://www.osc.state.ny.us/vendrep/index.htm

For New York State assistance contact DHSES at 1-866-837-9133 or email them at Grant.Info@dhses.ny.gov. To submit a question to us email to security.requests@jcrcny.org. Click on the buttons below for the necessary forms and the most up-to-date information. Click to the Community Security Initiative (a joint program of UJA-Federation and JCRC-NY) tutorials below for more information and guidance.

UASI

Federal Grant

Hate Crime

New York State Grant

In New York, federal Request for Applications due on March 18, 2020 by 5:00 p.m. Any at-risk nonprofit is eligible to apply for grants up to $100,000. Note the NSGP-UA is for organizations within a designated Urban Area (in NY:  NYC, Long Island and Westchester). Outside the NY Urban Area apply for the NSGP-S grant.

Click on the button above for the official downloads. Here are some additional helpful presentations and sources:

Some changes from last year.

New York State has two possible grants (check the eligibility criteria) and the due date for both Request for Applications is March 16, 2020 by 5:00 p.m. Organizations eligible to apply may request up to $50,000 per site. 

Click on the button above for the official downloads. Here are some additional helpful presentations and sources:

Note: State grant applicants may prequalify using a “streamlined” process found at https://grantsmanagement.ny.gov/securing-communities . Those prequalifying using the traditional prequalification process are prequalified for both grants.

Eligibility

 For the $25 million Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes grant, you must be:

  • a §501(c)(3) organization (see more details in the RFA); AND at least one of the following:
  • a nonprofit, nonpublic school; or
  • a nonprofit day care center; or
  • a nonprofit cultural museum, which is a building or site for the exhibition or promotion of arts and culture of a particular region or people; or
  • a nonprofit residential camp, which is occupied on an overnight basis by persons under eighteen years of age; or
  • a nonprofit community center (The best definition that we’ve seen is from FEMA, “A building, including attached structures and grounds, that is established and primarily used as a gathering place for a variety of social, educational enrichment, and community service activities consistent with the nonprofit’s IRS status.” (FEMA DAP9521.1) DHSES urges applicants that consider themselves to be “community centers” to do their best to explain why they are eligible.).

For the $20 million Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes for Nonpublic Schools and Day Camps grant, you must be:

To be considered for funding, eligible organizations must:

  • Have received a Recognition of Exempt Status Determination letter from the IRS pursuant to 26 USC §501(c)(3). Alternatively, the applicant may self-certify by providing a letter affirming that the organization qualifies as a §501(c)(3) organization and is exempt from tax pursuant to 26 USC §501(a); the organization must maintain tax exempt status throughout the life of the grant. If the organization’s tax-exempt status is jeopardized or placed into question at any point during the life of the grant, the organization must notify DHSES within fifteen (15) days;

AND

  • Meet at least one of the following:
    • are a nonprofit nonpublic school; or
    • are a nonprofit day camp, which is occupied on a scheduled basis at any time between June 1st and September 15th by children under sixteen years of age for a period of less than twenty-four hours;

AND

  • Be at risk of a hate crime due to ideology, beliefs, or mission as described by the applying organization under this RFA;

AND

  • Be registered, have recently applied for registration and such application remains pending, or be exempt from registering with the NYS Attorney General’s Office, Charities Bureau;

AND

  • Be prequalified, through New York State Grants Management at https://grantsmanagement.ny.gov/securing-communities prior to application submission.

 

Security grants updates | Deadline extended

February 14, 2020

February 14, 2020

New York State Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes

The NYS Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services moved the deadline for the SFY2019/2020 Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Program (SCAHC Program) and the SFY2019/2020 Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Program for Nonpublic Schools and Day Camps (SCAHC for Nonpublic Schools and Day Camps). The deadline for applications under both RFAs is March 16, 2020 at 5:00pm.

Important Resources for Application

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Nonprofit Security Grants Program

Rumors fly that the federal guidance to the grant will be released this afternoon. Another rumor is that the states will have to submit their application packages within 60 days (for NY applicants, sometime before Passover?). Meanwhile, here are some resources to help you to get started,

 

 

Recent Propaganda Releases by ISIS and Al-Qa’ida Promote Intensified Attacks by Supporters in the West

February 11, 2020

This assessment from NYPD has information that can be used to support both the federal and New York State grant applications. We highlighted issues concerning the Jewish community.


Open Source Assessment/February 10, 2020

Two recent extremist propaganda releases disseminated by ISIS’s al-Furqan Media and al-Qa’ida in the Arabian Peninsula’s (AQAP) Al-Malahem Media called on Salafi-jihadist supporters to intensify attacks as part of a retaliatory campaign of violence against the West, which may resonate with homegrown violent extremists (HVEs) based in the U.S. Both media campaigns referenced a broad variety of tactics, with ISIS’s statement promoting the use of conventional and chemical weapons, and AQAP’s message promoting simple, low-tech methods, as well as cyberwarfare campaigns.

  • While both propaganda statements called for an escalation in attack efforts, ISIS’s propaganda release notably emphasized a “new phase” geared specifically towards targeting Israeli and Jewish interests. ISIS previously referenced chemical weapons tactics in numerous propaganda graphics, demonstrating the group’s persistent support and interest in this attack method.  While the NYPD is not aware of any credible, active, or specific threats at this time, this statement, coupled with an already heightened threat environment, may serve as a catalyst for increased violence against Jewish communities.
  • Additionally, AQAP’s latest propaganda release may potentially have a stronger resonance with al-Qa’ida-aligned HVEs in the West following the recently confirmed death of Qasim al-Rimi, the leader of AQAP, who was killed in a targeted U.S. counterterrorism operation in Yemen.
  • On January 27, 2020, ISIS’s official media apparatus published a 37-minute Arabic-language audio statement attributed to its new spokesperson, Abu Hamza al-Qurayshi, marking his second speech since the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and spokesperson Abu al-Hassan al-Muhajir in separate U.S. counterterrorism operations. While much of the statement—titled “God Destroyed Them and a Similar Fate Awaits the Disbelievers”—revisited ISIS’s narrative of survivability and endurance despite strategic setbacks, al-Qurayshi notably declared war on Israel, and called for ISIS supporters to broadly intensify their attack efforts worldwide.
  •  Throughout the speech, al-Qurayshi claimed that U.S. narratives about ISIS’s defeat in the Middle East are false and that the U.S. has historically been unable to defeat its adversaries, specifically referring to the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq in 2011. He asserted that ISIS will persist despite al-Baghdadi’s death. The statement appears to have been recorded in recent weeks, as it also referenced the death of Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Quds Force (IRGC-QF) Major General Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in early January 2020.
  • After congratulating ISIS militants for waging a retaliatory campaign of violence in response to the deaths of al-Baghdadi and al-Muhajir, al-Qurayshi encouraged supporters to continue the revenge efforts by increasing the frequency of attacks. This specific statement could potentially resonate with lone offenders as a call to arms from core ISIS leadership.
  • Al-Qurayshi announced the beginning of a new stage for ISIS aimed at reclaiming Jerusalem. He specifically urged ISIS affiliates in the Sinai Peninsula and Syria to turn Israeli “settlements and markets into a proving ground for your rockets and chemical weapons.” He also ordered Muslims to thwart the U.S. peace plan referred to as the “Deal of the Century,” and implored Palestinians and Muslims worldwide to target Jews. While previous ISIS messaging also emphasized the targeting of Jewish and Israeli interests in an effort to inspire attacks by established ISIS affiliates and lone offender supporters, the emphasis on these targets in this audio message likely coincides with the latest proposed U.S. peace plan for the Middle East.
  • On February 6, U.S. President Donald Trump announced that Qasim al-Rimi, the emir of AQAP and potential heir to al-Qa’ida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, was killed in a U.S. military counterterrorism operation. Al-Rimi was previously featured in a propaganda video disseminated by AQAP on February 2 that claimed responsibility for the December 2019 shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola, praised global al-Qa’ida-affiliated operations, and emphasized the importance of continued retaliatory attacks against U.S. interests. Given al-Rimi’s death, his latest message urging lone offender attacks against the U.S. may also catalyze HVEs to conduct retaliatory attacks.
  • AQAP’s propaganda video featured Qasim al-Rimi, often pairing his image with other al-Qa’ida ideologues. He declared that AQAP was responsible for the December 2019 shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola which was conducted by Saudi aviation student Mohammed Saeed al-Shamrani, who he claimed was a sleeper agent for AQAP. Similar to the retaliatory narrative in past AQAP propaganda messages, he stated that the shooting was in revenge for crimes committed by the U.S. across Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Additionally, on February 4, the al-Qa’ida-affiliated al-Shabaab echoed this narrative by congratulating AQAP for its role in the Pensacola attack and encouraged continued lone offender operations in the West.
  • Al-Rimi connected the Pensacola shooting to other al-Qa’ida-affiliated operations, stating that it was part of a series of global attacks. He compared al-Shamrani to the group’s other perceived “heroes,” such as Nidal Malik Hassan, the November 2019 Fort Hood shooter, and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, one of the brothers who orchestrated the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, in a likely attempt to encourage similar operations by HVEs in the West.
  • Most significantly, al-Rimi explicitly called for lone offender attacks in the U.S and told supporters to make sure their “chief concern” is “America.” He urged students, journalists, doctors, engineers, merchants, workers, Arab and non-Arabs to use low-tech, simple tactics, including vehicle ramming, firearms, and explosives. He also encourages viewers to consult AQAP’s Inspire magazine for tactical guidance.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NEW YORK CITY

There is currently no direct, credible or specific threat to New York City following these recent propaganda releases by ISIS and AQAP media entities; however, ISIS’s calls for attacks against Jewish communities highlights the importance of vigilance for suspicious activity indicators at similar locations, houses of worship, and Jewish faith community gatherings throughout the five boroughs. In recent months, authorities have disrupted numerous plots by malicious actors from across the violent extremist ideological spectrum who espoused anti-Semitic views and targeted the Jewish community.

Security personnel are advised to be on alert for suspicious behavior that could indicate pre-operational surveillance for an attack. Such behavior could include individuals taking photographs of security procedures in place, and asking probing questions of security/law enforcement officers stationed outside such locations.

Information sharing and prompt reporting of suspicious behavior indicators between the public, private-sector security personnel, faith community leaders, and law enforcement authorities remains vital to the deterrence, detection, and disruption of terrorist activity and the prevention of attacks.

If You See Something, Say Something – 1-888-NYC-SAFE (1-888-692-7233)

Security funding updates

December 22, 2019

While our concerns about anti-Semitic attacks remain high, this week brought three new funding-related announcements that will help us to protect our institutions. We will notify our Security and Alert List when applications become available. To join our list, click here.

All those who wish to apply for upcoming grants should pre-qualify for the state or federal grant applications through the Grants Gateway Document Vault. Those having previously pre-qualified should check if their file is up-to-date. Get more help from JCRC-NY here. Also check out our dedicated webpage for more tips on how to successfully apply for grants.

  • Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes.The JCRC-NY is deeply grateful to Governor  for the latest awards of $10M in New York State security grants to schools (pre-school – 12) and museums. Grantees benefiting from this program applied in December 2018.  The announced awards will help 207 institutions to protect their people and facilities against hateful attacks. As of December 23, 2019 there is no new application for the next round of grants and will notify subscribers to the Security and Alert List as soon as we learn of  the availability of another round of grants.
  • Nonprofit Security Grant Program. Featuring a major victory for at-risk nonprofits, Congress completed the FY 2020 Appropriations Bills and the President is expected to sign them into law. This year, the team led by Rob Goldberg of JFNA’s DC office (including JCRC-NY and UJA-Federation as active members), successfully secured $90 million for the program, a 50% increase over the FY 2019 level:
    1.   $50 million will support NSGP-UA (Urban Area’s including NYC, Long Island and Westchester) projects; and
    2. $40 million will support NSGP-S projects (applicants outside the Urban Areas).

With the enactment of this legislation, the federal government will begin developing the FY 2020 program guidance and application (known as the Nonprofit Security Grant Program Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO)). Any at-risk 501(c)(3) organization (including houses of worship) can apply.

Our best guess is that applications will be available at the NY DHSES website in February or March. All NY organizations must apply through the process as outlined  by NYDHSES. We will notify subscribers to the Security and Alert List as soon as we learn of  the availability of another round of grants.

NSGP: Updated JCRC-NY Tutorial

May 01, 2019

From NY DHSES

Click here for the JCRC-NY updated Investment Justification tutorial.

From the NY DHSES FAQ’s

Question: What makes a strong Investment Justification?
Answer:

  • Clearly identified risks, vulnerabilities and consequences;
    Description of findings from a previously conducted vulnerability assessment;
  • Details of any incident(s) including description, dates, etc.;
  • A brief description of any supporting documentation (such as police reports or photographs) that is submitted as part of the application, if applicable;
  • Explanation of how the investments proposed will mitigate or address the vulnerabilities identified from a vulnerability assessment;
  • Establish a clear linkage with investment(s) and core capabilities (See National Preparedness Goal); see http://www.fema.gov/national-preparedness-goal for information on core capabilities;
  • All activities proposed in the application are allowable costs per the FY 2019 NSGP RFA;Realistic milestones that consider the Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation (EHP) review process, if applicable; and
  • Description of the project manager or managers’ level of experience.

NSGP: More on contracted security guards

April 25, 2019

Updated April 25, 2019| U.S. DHS posted its Fiscal Year 2019 Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO). We are reviewing the materials and have identified two key changes:

  • Grant amount. The maximum award this year will be $100,000.
  • Stacking the deck for new applicants. This year 10 bonus points will be added to the scores of organizations that never received NSGP funding. This effectively gives a serious advantage to newbies.
  • Security guards. Hiring of contracted security personnel is now allowed under this program (see the FEMA update here).
    • Note: Recipients of NSGP funding may use the grant to pay for contracted security personnel over the entire three year period of the grant. However, grantees should not assume that they will be successful applicants (you might not win a grant or this program may not exist in coming years) so you must be able to sustain this capability in future years without NSGP funding.
    • NSGP funds may not be used to purchase equipment for security guards. These costs should be classified as organization costs.
    • Subrecipients (grantees) may not use NSGP funding to hire full or part-time employees that will be placed on a nonprofit’s payroll.
    • Rob Goldberg of JFNA reports after speaking with FEMA, that the blanket waiver WILL be in place and interested subrecipients may now request up to 100% of their total award towards the cost of contacted security personnel.
    • JCRC comment: Make a case for security guards through an identified vulnerability included in your assessment (e.g., failure to review or monitor CCTV recordings for possible instances of hostile surveillance, inadequate access control measures, and or the lack of security guards during all hours of operation) and add “Contracted security guards” as an “Item to be purchased”  in IV.  Target Hardening (Note: there is no AEL number for Contracted security guards).

A case can readily be made for additional contracted security guards, additional hours or an upgrading replacement (e.g., unarmed to armed) of the existing guards.

Finally, we think that it is appropriate to remind you that security guards are no panacea. Security planning should entail a well-considered mix of personnel, plans, procedures, training, drills and exercises and security hardware. The judges tend to look at your assessments to see if you are addressing the most important vulnerabilities.

  • Investment Justification. At first glance we don’t see any changes in the 2019 Investment Justification. Download it here.
  • Timing. We estimate that the submission deadline for NY organizations be  mid-May. We will be producing and posting our tutorial material this week, but will schedule a webinar — with an opportunity for questions –after Pesach.

The New York Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (NY DHSES) posted its New York-specific Request for Applications here. Check their site and ours for updates.

The guidelines and the paperwork seems to closely track the FY 2018 guidelines  (with the exception of security guards), so if you have been drafting your applications based our existing help you will be in very good shape.

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