Category Archive: NSGP

New security funding for NY Jewish organizations

As you are considering how to best secure your organization while remaining welcoming, UJA-Federation and JCRC-NY are pleased to offer, with generous support from the Paul E. Singer Foundation, additional resources to keep you and your stakeholders safe and secure:

PROFESSIONAL SECURITY ASSESSMENT: Through JCRC, UJA-Federation is making available at no cost to you, professional security assessments so that you can immediately start safeguarding your institution and be ready to apply for Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and NY State grants. Organizations that professionally assessed are significantly more likely to receive funding than those that do not. For more information, review the information below or contact David Pollock at JCRC.

Apply Now

SECURITY GRANTS RECIPIENTS BRIDGE LOAN PROGRAM: Through the Hebrew Free Loan Society (HFLS), UJA has created a bridge loan fund providing capital to federal and state grant recipients to make all necessary upgrades immediately; and get reimbursed from the state later. Available on a first come, first served basis for organizations that have received security grants, but cannot afford to pay for security enhancements upfront while awaiting reimbursement from the government. This program provides interest-free loans of up to $150,000 to organizations in any of New York City’s five boroughs, Westchester, or Long Island Read here for more information, or contact HFLS Director of Finance Daren Scott.

Apply Now


Start with an assessment

A Terrorism Vulnerability Assessment  examines the threats to your Jewish organization, documents the gaps in physical security measures and security policies and procedures, and the consequences of a terrorist attack. The assessment will also recommend specific steps to mitigate the threats, specifically written to comport with the federal and state grant applications. Click here to apply for an experienced and credentialed security professional to conduct a Terrorism Vulnerability Assessment of your Jewish organization.

Assessments will be scheduled until the funding is exhausted. We hope to serve as many deserving organizations as possible.

Find out how to apply for government grants

Soon,  two grants will be available to certain New York nonprofits. Applications for both the state and federal grants must be submitted through the New York State Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Services. Click here for their nonprofit grants page. Here are the details.

New York State Grants Gateway/Prequalification

New York State will not accept applications for grants unless the nonprofit applicant is prequalified, i.e., applicants must upload basic organizational documents and answer questions about their nonprofit’s capacity and integrity. This portal is known as the “Grants Gateway.”

  • New applicants. See JCRC-NY’s additional information about how to get started and special instructions for religious corporations at: http://www.jcrcny.org/document-vault-faqs/.
  • Previously prequalified. If your nonprofit was previously prequalified, you will still have to update certain documents if your document vault “expires” (i.e, certain information goes out of date). Check out your Document Vault for more information.

Prequalification is not as hard as it may look, but it’s important to get started now! Your organization will not be able to apply unless you are prequalified.

New York State Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes grants

New York State, committed to ensuring the safety and equal treatment of all New Yorkers, is launching a second round of the Securing Communities Against Hate Crimes Program to boost safety and security at New York’s nonpublic schools, day care centers and cultural museums at risk of hate crimes or attacks because of their ideology, beliefs, or mission. In support of this effort, a total of $10.1 million in grant funding has been made available on a statewide basis.

  • Availability. Now.
  • Eligibility. Nonpublic schools (Preschool-12), nonprofit day care centers (including those housed in JCC’s and synagogues) and cultural museums that are at risk of hate crimes or attacks against their facilities because of their ideology, beliefs or mission. For the purpose of the grant, terrorism is included as a category of hate crime. Click here for the exact details on eligibility.
  • Maximum grant amount. Applications will be accepted for up to $50,000 per facility. Eligible organizations with multiple sites may submit up to three applications for a maximum total request of up to $150,000 allowed per organization.
  • What will the grant pay for?
    • Hardening the organization’s facility or facilities including recreational areas adjacent to the facility through exterior physical security enhancements; and/or
    • Providing security training that will advance the knowledge of security personnel and staff.
  • Deadline. Applications are due to Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services by 5:00 pm on December 19, 2018. Applications submitted past this date will be disqualified. Individual extensions will not be given.
  • Application form. Applicants must complete the DHSES Risk Evaluation Tool to describe the organization’s significant risk of a hate crime and its proposed equipment and training needs to prevent and protect against a hate crime.
  • Risk/Security/Threat Assessment. Applicants with a current or previously conducted (within three years) risk/security/threat assessment completed by a police department, private company or university should base their Risk Evaluation Tool submission on the information, analyses and findings contained in the risk/security/threat assessment(s). However, no assessment is required.
  • What are your chances? Last year, all of the eligible applicants that filed a complete application were awarded a grant.
  • Additional assistance. See JCRC-NY’s dedicated webpage at www.jcrcny.org/securitygrants.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Nonprofit Security Grant Program

Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) provides funding support for target hardening and other physical security enhancements to nonprofit organizations.

    • Availability. Sometime in Spring, 2019.
    • Eligibility. Nonprofit organizations in New York City, Long Island and Westchester that are determined to be at high risk of a terrorist attack by the Department of Homeland Security.
    • Maximum grant amount. Unknown. Last year the maximum was $150,000. The upcoming grant may place a $100,000 cap (or less) so that more organizations can be funded.
    • What will the grant pay for? Allowable costs are focused on target hardening and physical security enhancements. Funding can be used for the acquisition and installation of security equipment on real property (including buildings and improvements) owned or leased by the nonprofit organization, specifically in prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack. This equipment is limited to select items in the following two categories of items on the Authorized Equipment List (AEL):
      • Physical Security Enhancement Equipment (Category 14)
      • Inspection and Screening Systems (Category 15)
      • Training. Allowable training topics are limited to the protection of critical infrastructure key resources, including physical and cybersecurity, target hardening, and terrorism awareness/employee preparedness including programs such as Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training, Active Shooter training, and emergency first aid training. Training conducted using NSGP funds must address a specific threat and/or vulnerability, as identified in the nonprofit organization’s Investment Justification.
      • Planning. Funding may be used for security or emergency planning expenses and the materials required to conduct planning activities. Planning must be related to the protection of the facility and the people within the facility and should include with access and functional needs as well as those with limited English proficiency. Examples of planning activities allowable under this program include:
        • Development and enhancement of security plans and protocols;
        • Development or further strengthening of security assessments;
        • Emergency contingency plans;
        • Evacuation/Shelter-in-place plans; and
        • Other project planning activities with prior approval from DHS/FEMA.

Deadline. Unknown. It is unlikely that this grant will be offered until there is a federal budget in place.

Application form. Applicants must complete a spreadsheet called an Investment Justification. We assume that the 2019 Investment Justification will be similar to those used in previous years, so applicants thinking of applying for the federal grant should draft their answers using the 2018 form and cut and paste their responses into the 2019 form when it is released.

  • Risk/Security/Threat Assessment. The Investment Justification asks for findings from a “previously conducted risk assessment. The most useful risk assessments are from certified, independent security professionals, but police department crime prevention surveys and self assessments are acceptable.
  • What are your chances? Last year, 112 nonprofits in the New York area were awarded Nonprofit Security Grant Program grants and approximately twice that number applied.
  • Additional assistance. See JCRC-NY’s dedicated webpage at www.jcrcny.org/securitygrants.

 

Hebrew Free Loan Society bridge loans for security grant recipients

The Hebrew Free Loan Society’s Security Grants Bridge Loan Program provides interest-free loans of up to $150,000 to Jewish Community agencies in any of New York City’s five boroughs, Westchester, or Long Island that have been awarded government grants to fund security improvements. These grants require agencies to pay up front for the work and then to submit receipts for reimbursement, which causes a cash flow problem for some agencies to the point that they are unable to take advantage of the award. HFLS is partnering with UJA-Federation of New York to provide interest-free bridge loan financing to ensure that grant awardees can proceed with the work necessary to increase security and safety for their community. Click here to learn more and here for the application.

NSGP: The June 9th deadline is approaching

Posted on May 30, 2018

Note: The new deadline is June 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM

General information

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security released its Notice of Funding Opportunity.

  • In FY 2018, Congress appropriated $50 million for nonprofit security through the Urban Area Security Initiative (NSGP-UA) for 32 regions, including New York City (including Long Island and Westchester). There is a supplemental program (NSGP-S) of $10 million (with grants up to $100,000) covering areas outside of the designated regions.
  • Each eligible organization can apply for equipment totaling $150,000.
  • Target hardening proposals can now include equipment, planning and training.
  • Should I apply to NSGP-UA or NSGP-S?
    If your nonprofit organization is physically located within a FY 2018 UASI-designated urban area, then you may apply to NSGP-UA; if your nonprofit organization is not physically located within a FY 2018 UASI-designated urban area then you may apply to NSGP-S. You may not apply to both programs. For more information about the NSGP-S (supplemental) program for organizations outside of the 32 designated areas, see the JFNA preliminary memorandum here.

NY Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services materials

Help with grant applications

If you’ve read the materials on this webpage and still have questions? Click here.

The Nonprofit Security Grant Program is here

Posted on May 22, 2018

 

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security released its Notice of Funding Opportunity yesterday. As expected the time frame will be quite narrow.  New York DHSES is getting final approvals on its Request for Applications. It will be available here. Our best guess is that the deadline will be in 2-3 weeks.

  • In FY 2018, Congress appropriated $50 million for nonprofit security through the Urban Area Security Initiative (NSGP-UA) for 32 regions, including New York City (including Long Island and Westchester). There is a supplemental program of $10 million.
  • Each eligible organization can apply for equipment totaling $150,000.
  • Target hardening proposals can now include equipment, planning and training.
  • For information about the NSGP-S (supplemental) program for organizations outside of the 32 designated areas, see the JFNA preliminary memorandum here.
  • See our presentation, with much more information here and our new help document Tying together the risk and target hardening language. See the information below for the next steps.

    CONFERENCE CALL FOR NONPROFIT OFFICIALS AND LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS

    ·       Date:                           Thursday, May 24, 2018

    ·       Time:                          3:30 PM (EDT)

    ·       Call-In #:                    1-800-369-2127

    ·       Participant Passcode: 5804555

    ·       Adobe Connect Link: https://fema.connectsolutions.com/rs6yezjijsiv/


Getting started


The process and application is likely to be quite similar to last year’s RFA (Request for Applications) :

  • Prequalification. Plan to complete your prequalification ASAP. New York State will not accept applications for grants unless the applicant is prequalified, i.e., applicants must upload basic organizational documents and answer questions about their nonprofit’s capacity and integrity. This portal is known as the “Grants Gateway.”
    • New applicants. See JCRC-NY’s additional information about how to get started and special instructions for religious corporations at: http://www.jcrcny.org/document-vault-faqs/. Updated
    • Previously prequalified. If your nonprofit was previously prequalified, you will still have to update certain documents if your document vault “expires” (i.e, certain information goes out of date). Check out your Document Vault for more information.
  • E-Grants. New York State applicants to both programs must submit all of their application package through the E-grants system. Download the E-Grants Registration and follow the instructions to obtain an account and password. The E-Grants Tutorial shows you how to get through the process.
  • Risk/vulnerability assessment. The federal grant requires organizations to submit an assessment and the state grant asks for much of the same information. Learn more about the options to get a risk assessment or to conduct one yourself here. Use this information to complete the “Vulnerability” section on the Investment Justification.
  • Look at the 2017 Investment Justification. Click here to see and download an example of what the application looks like. We expect very few changes. We will post the 2018 Invesment Justification as soon as it is available.
  • Learn about risk and threats.  Review JCRC-NY’s Selective Threat Scan for help on how to answer the questions on threats and consequences.
  • Equipment. Click here to see the Authorized Equipment List from 2017. We do not expect many changes.
  • Subscribe. Click here to add your name to the JCRC-NY Security and Emergency Preparedness Alert list, which will notify you about additional details when they become available.

Get started: Grants Gateway

Posted on April 27, 2018

Update: The grant guidance for the federal Nonprofit Security Grant Program is rumored to be released in late May. We expect very few changes in the application process for nonprofits in the defined UASI areas (see the 2017 areas here), but are unsure about the process and requirements outside the defined UASI areas. In New York State applicants are required to “Prequalify.” See our updated help on Prequalifying below. If you have other questions click to our dedicated webpage, www.jcrcny.org/securitygrants.

Prequalification
In order to apply for any grant through New York State applicants are required to “prequalify” through the Grants Gateway. There, applicants answer questions about their governance, policies and practices. Here’s more info:

Registration
On the Grants Reform Website download a copy of the Registration Form for Administrator.

  • Mail a signed, notarized original Registration Form for Administrator, substitute W-9 form and organizational chart (see samples here) to the Division of Budget at the address provided in the instructions. If all of your submissions are in order you will be provided with a Username and Password allowing you to access the Grants Gateway within 48-72 hours. The first time that you sign onto the system you will be asked to change your password.

Getting more help

  • Review the list of documents that must be uploaded into the secure document vault. Upload the required documents and answers to the questions. See the information below with specifics for religious corporations.

Answering the Organizational Capacity questions
Consider the Grants Gateway process as an “educational” experience. Grants Gateway asks questions that represent “best practices” for well-run nonprofits with the hope that organizations will adopt policies consistent with good governance.  Some policies are required by law.

  1. Staff Code of Conduct: All organizations should have a personnel manual. Here is an example of a template to help you put one together.
  2. Fiscal/Internal Controls Policy. A primary responsibility of a nonprofit’s board of directors is to ensure that the organization is accountable for its programs and finances to its contributors, members, the public and government regulators. Click here for the NY AG’s guidance and here for the National Council of Nonprofits’ We’re a small nonprofit. What internal controls do we need to have in place?
  3. Conflict of Interest Policy: All NY nonprofit corporations must have a Conflict of Interest Policy. Sample Conflict of Interest Policy   Annual Form
  4. Whistleblower Policy: Nonprofit corporations or charitable trusts with 20 or more employees and an annual revenue in excess of $1,000,000 in the prior fiscal year must have a Whistleblower Policy. Click here for a sample.

Your board of directors should approve the above policies.

Required documents for religious corporations
(e.g., synagogues or religious schools incorporated as religious corporations)

  • Articles of Incorporation: You should already have a Certificate or Articles of Incorporation demonstrating that you are incorporated under the New York Religious Corporations Law.
  • 501(c)(3) Status: Religious corporations should provide their IRS Recognition Letter ( also known as a 501(c )(3) or tax exemption letter) from the IRS if they have one. Those that do not, may satisfy this requirement by uploading a signed letter, on organization letterhead, stating they are exempt from this requirement.
  • Bylaws: For an example of bylaws click on the appropriate link (Members/No Members) and an explanation of New York State synagogue bylaws here.
  • Form 990: Religious corporations are not required to file IRS Form 990. In lieu of this form, applicants may upload a signed letter, on organization letterhead, stating they are exempt from filing a Form 990. When asked for the “Next due date”, state 1/1/2020.
  • Audited Financial Statements/Reviews: Religious corporations that do not have a formal audit may upload your financial report from the previous fiscal year. It can be a review from an accountant or even a QuickBooks “Profit and Loss” and a “Balance Sheet” report showing income and expenses. It should be accompanied by a letter signed by the President, Secretary or Treasurer; stating that the Board of Directors/Trustees reviewed and approved the financial report.
  • CHAR 410 and CHAR 500:
    • Religious corporations must file the first page of CHAR 410(basically name, address and contact information) of the CHAR410 (Registration Statement for Charitable Organizations: form, instructions), along with the Schedule E (Request for Registration Exemption for Charitable Organizations).
    • On the Schedule E, fill out your name and EIN (you will not have your NY State registration number until this form is approved).
    • Then, check off the box at the top of the page next to “Both EPTL and Article 7-A”; the box in Part I, number 5; and the box in Part II, number 5.
    • Mail the completed first page of the CHAR 410, the Schedule E, a copy of your Certificate of Incorporation and the required fee ($25 payable to “NYS Department of Law.”)  to: New York State Department of Law (Office of the Attorney General), Charities Bureau – Registration Section, 28 Liberty Street, New York, NY 10005.
    • Copy the first page of your CHAR410 and your Schedule E and upload them to the system. You will have to update this item when your submission is approved by the NY Attorney General. Nonprofits that are not religious corporations must file a CHAR500. 

Great news: Omnibus Bill has $50M plus for nonprofit security grants

Posted on March 22, 2018

Congressional leaders posted the text of Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 (aka the Omnibus Bill)) last night. Its passage will keep the government operating for the remainder of the fiscal year. Included in the bill (besides the Taylor Force Act) is an allocation of $50 million (up from $25M) for the Nonprofit Security Grants Program (NSGP) and $10 million for nonprofits outside of the designated UASI regions (Good news for upstate and Connecticut institutions).

We won’t know when the application package will be available or the deadline for submission until the U.S. Department of Homeland Security releases its guidance. People always complain that they aren’t given enough time to complete their applications so we advise you to click to www.jcrcny.org/securitygrants and follow the instructions to get started now.

The projected increase in the grant allocation would not be possible without our Congressional champions. A major push for the $50 million came in a bipartisan “Dear Colleague” letter to the leadership of the House Appropriations Committee (including the Ranking Member, our own Rep. Nita Lowey) circulated by Representatives Bill Pascrell, Jr. and our own Dan Donovan, Jr. Our New York delegation figured prominently among the signers, including: Representatives Yvette Clarke, Joseph Crowley, Eliot Engel, Adriano Espaillat, John Faso, Hakeem Jeffries, John Katko, Peter King, Carolyn Maloney, Gregory Meeks, Jerrold Nadler, Thomas Suozzi, Kathleen Rice, Claudia Tenney and Nydia Velázquez. Of course, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Democratic Leader Charles Schumer were helpful in the Senate. Please contact their offices to let them know that you appreciate their leadership.

JCRC-NY and UJA-Federation are key members of the dynamic coalition that pushes for this legislation year-after-year. The linchpin of this effort is Rob Goldberg of the Washington, DC office of the Jewish Federations of North America. Our friend, William Daroff, the senior vice president for public policy and director of the Washington office of The Jewish Federations of North America, plays an important role.